Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

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Welcome to the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) is the science provider for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. In this role, the research center provides the public and decision makers with relevant scientific information about the status and trends of natural, cultural, and recreational resources found in those portions of Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area affected by Glen Canyon Dam operations.

 

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Effects of fluctuation flows and a controlled flood on incubation success and early survival rates and growth of age-0 rainbow trout in a large regulated river External Window Icon
Hourly fluctuations in flow from Glen Canyon Dam were increased in an attempt to limit the population of nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Colorado River, Arizona, due to concerns about negative effects of nonnative trout on endangered native fishes. Controlled floods have also be...
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Kanab Ambersnail habitat mitigation for the 2008 high flow experiment—August 2009 draft cooperator report from Arizona Game and Fish Department External Window Icon
Long-term fish monitoring in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam is an essential component of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP). The GCDAMP is a federally authorized initiative to ensure that the primary mandate of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 to protect resour...
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Status and Trends of the Rainbow Trout Population in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, 1991–2009 External Window Icon
The Lees Ferry reach of the Colorado River, a 25-kilometer segment of river located immediately downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, has contained a nonnative rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) sport fishery since it was first stocked in 1964. The fishery has evolved over time in response to changes in...
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Three Experimental High-Flow Releases from Glen Canyon am, Arizona—Effects on the Downstream Colorado River Ecosystem External Window Icon
Three high-flow experiments (HFEs) were conducted by the U.S. Department of the Interior at Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in March 1996, November 2004, and March 2008. Also known as artificial or controlled floods, these scheduled releases of water above the dam’s powerplant capacity were designed to mi...
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Flow structures and sandbar dynamics in a canyon river during a controlled flood, Colorado River, Arizona External Window Icon
In canyon rivers, debris fan constrictions create rapids and downstream pools characterized by secondary flow structures that are closely linked to channel morphology. In this paper we describe detailed measurements of the three-dimensional flow structure and sandbar dynamics of two pools along the ...
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Mechanics and modeling of flow sediment transport and morphologic change in riverine lateral separation zones, in Hydrology and sedimentation for a changing future External Window Icon
Lateral separation zones or eddies in rivers are critically important features for sediment storage and for a variety of roles they play in riparian and aquatic ecology. As part of a larger effort to predict the morphology of lateral separation zones in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon for a selec...
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Grain-size evolution in suspended sediment and deposits from the 2004 and 2008 controlled-flood experiments in the Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona, in Hydrology and sedimentation for a changing future; existing and emerging issues External Window Icon
Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, the hydrology, sediment supply, and distribution and size of modern alluvial deposits in the Colorado River through Grand Canyon have changed substantially (e.g., Howard and Dolan, 1981; Johnson and Carothers, 1987; Webb et al., 1999; Rubin et al., 2002...
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Status and Trends of the Rainbow Trout Population in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, 1991-2009 External Window Icon
The Lees Ferry reach of the Colorado River, a 25-kilometer segment of river located immediately downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, has contained a nonnative rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) sport fishery since it was first stocked in 1964. The fishery has evolved over time in response to changes in...
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Trout piscivory on the Colorado River, Grand Canyon: Effects of turbidity, temperature, and fish prey availability External Window Icon
Introductions of nonnative salmonids, such as rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta, have affected native fishes worldwide in unforeseen and undesirable ways. Predation and other interactions with nonnative rainbow trout and brown trout have been hypothesized as contributing...
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The effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on early life stages of rainbow trout in the Colorado River External Window Icon
The Lees Ferry reach of the Colorado River—a 16-mile segment from Glen Canyon Dam to the confluence with the Paria River—supports an important recreational rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fishery. In Grand Canyon, nonnative rainbow trout prey on and compete for habitat and food with native fish,...
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Three experimental high-flow releases from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona; effects on the downstream Colorado River ecosystem External Window Icon
Three high-flow experiments (HFEs) were conducted by the U.S. Department of the Interior at Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in March 1996, November 2004, and March 2008. Also known as artificial or controlled floods, these scheduled releases of water above the dam’s powerplant capacity were designed to mi...
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Effects of three high-flow experiments on the Colorado River ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona External Window Icon
Three high-flow experiments (HFEs) were conducted by the U.S. Department of the Interior at Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in March 1996, November 2004, and March 2008. These experiments, also known as artificial or controlled floods, were large-volume, scheduled releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam th...
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Non-Native Fish Control below Glen Canyon Dam—Report from a Structured Decision-Making Project External Window Icon
This report describes the results of a structured decision-making project by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide substantive input to the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for use in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment concerning control of non-native fish below Glen Canyon Dam. A for...
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Development of a temperature-dependent growth model for the endangered humpback chub using capture-recapture data External Window Icon
Model derived predictions of fish growth are frequently required for detailed investigations of population dynamics to inform management decisions. Simple growth models are typically fit to paired age and length data, but age data is often not available from endangered species because of restricti...
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Effects of the 2008 high-flow experiment on water quality in Lake Powell and Glen Canyon Dam releases, Utah-Arizona  External Window Icon
Under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, the U.S. Geological Survey‘s Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) conducted a high-flow experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) from March 4 through March 9, 2008. This experiment was conducted under enriched sediment conditions ...
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Aeolian reworking of sandbars from the March 2008 Glen Canyon Dam high-flow experiment in Grand Canyon External Window Icon
The March 2008 high-flow experiment (HFE) replenished many sandbars along the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon downstream from Glen Canyon Dam. Some of those sandbars are source areas from which windblown sand moves inland to feed aeolian (wind-formed) sand dunes. Aeolian movement of san...
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Basal resources in backwaters of the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam--effects of discharge regimes and comparison with mainstem depositional environments External Window Icon
Eight species of fish were native to the Colorado River before the closure of Glen Canyon Dam, but only four of these native species are currently present. A variety of factors are responsible for the loss of native fish species and the limited distribution and abundance of those that remain. These ...
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Weather and aeolian sand-transport data from the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona External Window Icon
This report presents measurements of weather parametersand aeolian (windblown) sand transport made in 2008 near selected archaeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The quantitative methods and data discussed here form a basis for monitoring ecosystem pro-cesses t...
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Evaluating Effects of a High-Flow Event on Rainbow Trout Movement in Glen and Marble Canyons, Arizona, by Using Acoustic Telemetry and Relative Abundance Measures External Window Icon
In March 2008, the Department of the Interior conducted a high-flow event (HFE; 1,175 cubic meters per second for 60 hours) through Glen Canyon Dam and Grand Canyon. This study evaluated the impact of the HFE on movement of adult and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lees Ferry. D...
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Effects of high-flow experiments from Glen Canyon Dam on abundance, growth, and survival rates of early life stages of rainbow trout in the Lees Ferry Reach of the Colorado River External Window Icon
High-flow experiments (HFEs) from Glen Canyon Dam are primarily intended to conserve fine sediment and improve habitat conditions for native fish in the Colorado River as it flows through Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. These experimental flows also have the potential to affect the rainbow trou...
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Short-Term Effects of the 2008 High-Flow Experiment on Macroinvertebrates in Colorado River Below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona External Window Icon
Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically altered the physical environment (especially discharge regime, water temperatures, and sediment inputs) of the Colorado River. High-flow experiments (HFE) that mimic one aspect of the natural hydrograph (floods) were implemented in 1996, 2004, and 2008. The primary g...
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20,000 grain-size observations from the bed of the Colorado River and implications for sediment transport through Grand Canyon External Window Icon
In the late 1990s, we developed digital imaging hardware and software for in-situ mapping of sand-sized bed sediment of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. This new technology enables collection and processing of hundreds of grain-size samples in a day. Bed grain size was mapped using this equipment...
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Kanab Ambersnail Habitat Mitigation for the 2008 High Flow Experiment External Window Icon
The Arizona Game and Fish Department and its Federal partners in ambersnail recovery helped mitigate habitat loss for the endangered Kanab ambersnail (Succineidae: Oxyloma haydeni kanabensis Pilsbry) for the March 2008 High Flow Experiment from Glen Canyon Dam. This mitigation effort was conducte...
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Development and application of a water temperature model for the Colorado River Below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona External Window Icon
Filling of Lake Powell upstream from Glen Canyon Dam during the 1970s transformed the seasonally warm Colorado River into a consistently cold river. The loss of seasonal variability in the downstream thermal regime has altered the biota of the river corridor, particularly native fishes and the aquat...

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Grand Canyon Monitoring & Research Center | 2255 North Gemini Drive Flagstaff, AZ 86001 | Phone: 928.556.7380 Fax: 928.556.7100

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Last Update: November 3, 2011