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Historical Photos - A Look Back in Time

Bottom of 209-Mile Rapid (mile 209.3L), looking downstream. Erosion of sandbars is one of the major problems caused by clearwater releases from Glen Canyon Dam. At the bottom of 209-Mile Rapid, a boatman in 1890 rested on a sandy beach, whereas the boatman in 1990 had to lay on rocks! In general, erosion of sandbars decreases downstream of about river mile 120, and this site is no exception. The sandbar on river right (at right center) has significantly aggraded between 1890 and 1990. Although many of the rocks in the foreground are still present after a century, some, including the one serving as a backrest at lower right, have been rotated.

Bottom of 209-Mile Rapid (mile 209.3L), looking downstream. March 1, 1880 (R. Stanton)

March 1, 1880 (R. Stanton)

Bottom of 209-Mile Rapid (mile 209.3L), looking downstream. February 14, 1990 (R. Hopkins)

February 14, 1990 (R. Hopkins)

Compare historical photographs with photographs taken during and after the 2008 high-flow experiment at 14 study sites.
Tables summarizing changes in sandbar area and vegetation are provided. [Download Photographic Comparisons (.pdf format)]

Style: Graphical Version | Text Version

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Last Update: November 3, 2011